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In past civilizations the Moon was regarded as a deity, its dominion dramatically manifested in its rhythmic control over the tides and the cycle of female fertility.Ancient lore and legend tell of the power of the Moon to instill spells with magic, to transform humans into beasts, and to send people’s behaviour swaying perilously between sanity and lunacy (from the Latin , “Moon”).Although many questions remain about its composition, structure, and history, it has become clear that the Moon holds keys to understanding the origin of Earth and the solar system.Moreover, given its nearness to Earth, its rich potential as a source of materials and energy, and its qualifications as a laboratory for planetary science and a place to learn how to live and work in space for extended times, the Moon remains a prime location for humankind’s first settlements beyond Earth orbit.

In "Moving Targets," students use a ball and wastebasket to simulate some of the difficulties of landing on a moving target. B-29 Frozen in Time In "Arctic Engineering," students follow problem-solving techniques used by scientists in the program and generate strategies for improving upon the scientists' solutions. Crash of Flight 111 In "Piecing It All Together," learn about the techniques and reasoning used to determine the cause of the 1998 crash of Swissair Flight 111. Daredevils of the Sky In "Daredevils of the Classroom," students design and experiment with the size, shape, angle of the wings, rudder position, and weight of a paper airplane. Daring Flight, A In "Blriot's Inventions," students analyze the evolution of designs that led up to the invention of the Blriot XI, the first plane to cross the English Channel. Fast Cars In "Slow Riders," students practice using the scientific method to design a helicopter that falls as slowly as possible. ," students test the effects of wing warping by manipulating the leading and trailing edges on the wings of a paper airplane. ," students test the effects of wing warping by manipulating the leading and trailing edges on the wings of a paper airplane. Properties of Matter Absolute Zero In "Building a Bulb Thermometer," students build and calibrate their own bulb thermometers. ," students learn about a new theoretical fundamental unit -- a string -- and explore how its vibrational pattern indicates the particle it is. Elegant Universe, The: Einstein's Dream In "Deducting Dimensions," students visualize a universe with fewer than three spatial dimensions and consider how more than three spatial dimensions could exist in the universe. Elegant Universe, The: Einstein's Dream In "Detective Work," students find out how to interpret particle interactions captured in one type of detector, a bubble chamber. Fall of the Leaning Tower In "Hold It Up," students experiment with different soil structures and measure the ability of each to carry a specific load. Lincoln's Secret Weapon In "Dive, Dive, Dive," students explore how principles of gas behavior relate to diving in order to plan safe underwater activities. Lost on Everest In "Keeping Warm," students test how effectively common clothing fabrics insulate against cold and consider the technological design of different fabrics. Monster of the Milky Way In "Dense, Denser, Densest?Poets and composers were invoking the Moon’s romantic charms and its darker side, and writers of fiction were conducting their readers on speculative lunar journeys long before Apollo astronauts, in orbit above the Moon, sent back photographs of the reality that human eyes were witnessing for the first time.Centuries of observation and scientific investigation have been centred on the nature and origin of the Moon.(Right) Far side of the Moon with some of the near side visible (upper right), photographed by the Apollo 16 spacecraft.The Moon’s desolate beauty has been a source of fascination and curiosity throughout history and has inspired a rich cultural and symbolic tradition.

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