30 most intimidating baseball players

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Listed in college at 6'8" and 275 pounds, he instead signed with the Dodgers organization, and after a handful of appearances in 19 he succeeded Carl Furillo as Los Angeles' right fielder in 1960; he was named the Minor League Player of the Year in 1959 by The Sporting News after hitting 43 homers in the Pacific Coast League.He was named the NL's Rookie of the Year after batting .268 with 23 home runs and 77 RBI, and was nicknamed "Hondo" by teammates after a John Wayne film.Howard's Washington/Texas franchise records of 1,172 games, 4,120 at bats, 246 HRs, 1,141 hits, 701 RBI, 544 runs, 155 doubles, 2,074 total bases and a .503 slugging average have since been broken.An All-American in both basketball and baseball at Ohio State, Howard was drafted by the Philadelphia Warriors of the NBA.The seat which it hit was painted white against the conforming gold to commemorate the event [1].In a game at Fenway Park, he hit a line drive that struck the center field wall 390 feet from home plate and bounced into Reggie Smith's glove before Howard had even reached first base.Howard finished the season leading the AL with 44 HR, a .552 slugging average and 330 total bases, and was second to Ken Harrelson with 106 RBI; he made his first of four consecutive All-Star teams, and placed eighth in the MVP balloting, although the Senators finished in tenth (last) place with a 65–96 record.

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He would go on to hit 13 homers in 16 games, a mark that still stands, matched only by Albert Belle in 1995.

When new owner Bob Short signed retired slugger Williams to manage the club, Howard happily surrendered #9 so the Hall of Famer could wear it once again; Howard donned #33 for the start of the 1969 season.

Williams played a major role in teaching him to be more patient at the plate, asking the slugger, "Can you tell me how a guy can hit 44 home runs and only get 48 bases on balls?

" He encouraged Howard to lay off the first fastball he saw, and work pitchers deeper into the count, advice which resulted in Howard's walk totals nearly doubling.

Beginning in 1968, he appeared semi-regularly at first base in order to limit the wear and tear of playing the outfield daily.

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